SIBO Lifestyle Resource – SIBO Cookbooks

Rebecca Coomes, founder of The Healthy Gut, has created the world’s first dedicated cookbooks for SIBO.

She is a passionate foodie and entrepreneur, who is on a mission to help anyone who is on the SIBO journey and yearns to uplift their culinary experience whilst on the Bi-Phasic Diet.

Rebecca, having wished for more support during her own recovery from SIBO, now brings you a platter of possibility to support your patients when healing this condition.

Head over to SIBO Summit for your free access to Rebecca’s story, captured on video at the SIBO Summit 2016.

Of course you’re always welcome to make use of our Practitioner Education Portal as well.

In health

SIBOtest Team

Untangling The Web: Visceral Mobilisation In SIBO

alyssa-tait-SIBO

Alyssa Tait is a physiotherapist and naturopath who specialises in abdominal and pelvic pain disorders, the gut, and urogenital microbiome.

Alyssa joined the SIBO Summit to introduce us to a therapy synergistic to SIBO treatment – visceral manipulation.

Visceral manipulation is a gentle manual therapy that aids the body to release restriction and unhealthy compensations, pain and disfunction.

In her talk, Alyssa highlights:

  • The role of fascia and connective tissue in maintaining healthy biomechanics of soft and hard tissues of the body.
  • Visceral manipulation
    • What is it?
    • How it works?
    • What is it useful for?
    • Therapeutic application for SIBO treatment
  • Restrictions, including adhesions and strictures and the role of visceral manipulation in their management.
  • Where to find visceral manipulation treatment.

Alyssa also gives us a taste of what this therapy might feel like by guiding us to try out a simple technique on ourselves.

To access your full copy of Alyssa’s brilliant talk, head to SIBO Summit

Of course you’re always welcome to make use of our Practitioner Education Portal as well.

In health

SIBOtest Team

SIBO Christmas E-Cookbook

christmas SIBO recipe book sibotest

Merry SIBO Christmas!

Are your patients wondering how they can rise to the SIBO Christmas food challenge?

Rebecca Coomes has it covered with her tantalising treats and happy holiday eats in the just released SIBO Christmas E-Cookbook.

Head over and check it out.

Happy Holidays!

SIBOtest Team

Travelling Tips for SIBO patients

By Dr. Nirala Jacobi, BHSc, ND (USA)

As most SIBO patients know, the dietary restrictions are an important part of the success of the treatment.  Travelling or eating out can be daunting occasions which can easily throw off the diet. In addition, patients with post-infectious SIBO (SIBO which occurred after a case of food poisoning) are 5 x more likely to contract another case of food poisoning! Prevention of food poisoning is therefore extremely important to prevent further damage.

What to eat

We recommend patients follow the SIBO Bi-Phasic diet whilst being treated for SIBO (a more stricter version of low FODMAP diet). Please consult with your practitioner as to which phase of the Bi-phasic diet you are to follow.   If this proves too hard, download the Monash FODMAP app which gives green lights on foods with low fermentable fibres.  This is not a specific diet for SIBO, but it will do in a pinch.

Flying

  • Consult with your airline for any travel with meal service. Though none currently have a low FODMAP diet, all airlines cater to certain diets and these can differ. For starters,  request no dairy and  gluten and see how amenable they are for specific food requests.
  • Take ample snacks in case you can’t eat much of what they serve: boiled eggs, nuts, almond meal pikelets, and rice cakes with almond butter, cut vegetables are all good travelling foods. (Note:  many countries have strict custom laws which prohibit bringing fresh food into the country, so you may have to throw out your left overs upon arrival)

On the ground

  • Drink bottled water vs tap water
  • Avoid raw salads (unless cleanliness of restaurant is assured)
  • Wash fruit well
  • Avoid lemon or lime wedges from the bar
  • Eat well cooked meat, chicken, fish
  • Avoid foods from street vendors or “finger foods”
  • Wash your hands often (do not rely on hand sanitisers)

Medicinals

One of the best ways to prevent food poisoning is to enhance the natural antimicrobial activity of stomach acid (HCL), bile, and enzymes which are produced to help us digest foods and kill food borne bacteria.  The following suggestions are good adjuncts to your relapse prevention plan whilst travelling.  Note: it is not necessary to take all of them, pick one from each category

Digestive Aids

  • Herbal Bitters – very effective to improve these digestive juices. If you cannot find a good one, you may be able to have one made up at a health food store with a herbal dispensary. Dr Jacobi’s formula is equal parts of Oregon Grape/Gentian/Baical Skullcap/Dandelion root. Take 3 whole droppers in water 15 minutes before meals
  • Betaine HCL – supplemental HCL to increase the acidity of the stomach. Not recommended for those with known history of gastritis.

Antimicrobials

  • Berberine containing antimicrobial products: Berberine-500 and Bactrex are good examples.  Take 1-2 capsules of either formula daily for prevention, increase to 2 caps 3x daily for acute illness (ideally berberine content of around 2-4 grams)
  • Rifaximin 200-500mg daily – this is prescription medication specific for SIBO. Dr Mark Pimentel (SIBO researcher and gastroenterologist) suggests this dose daily whilst travelling to prevent food poisoning.  Can be increased to 550mg 3x daily for active flare.

Additional support

  • Saccharomyces boulardii – a beneficial yeast with many digestive benefits. It is a great aid in the prevention of travelers diarrhoea.  It increases the gut’s immune response. Though also helpful for candida, it is not recommended for those with allergy to yeasts.  SB Floractiv is a good product in Australia – take about 500mg daily preventatively
  • Melatonin (by prescription in Australia) – great for prevention of jet lag but also considered a prokinetic (keeps the small intestines moving) – take 2-5mg nightly.

 

Chai spiced banana muffins

Do you want to spice up your day with a SIBO friendly super snack? Chai spiced banana muffins are just the ticket.

Makes 10 muffins

Classification: Phase 1 Friendly, semi-restricted

GF, DF, LF

These banana muffins are a perfect mid-morning snack and are deliciously moist and aromatic. You would never know they were part of a SIBO diet!

Ingredients

  • 4 free range eggs
  • 2 bananas, mashed
  • 2 tbs raw organic honey
  • 3 tbs ghee or coconut oil, melted plus extra for greasing
  • ½ cup coconut flour
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • ½ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ½ tsp ground cardamom
  • ½ tsp ground cloves
  • ½ teaspoon bi carb soda
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 10 pecans
  • Ghee to serve

Method

Preheat your oven to 180c.

Prepare a 12-cup muffin pan by greasing it with ghee or coconut oil or lining the tins with muffin cases. Set aside.

In a food processor, mix the bananas and eggs until well combined and free from lumps.  Blitz in the honey and melted ghee or coconut oil.

Add in the coconut flour, spices, bi carb soda and baking powder and blitz until combined.

Pour the batter into the prepared muffin tin.  Place one pecan on the top of each muffin.

Bake for 20 – 25 minutes.  To test if the muffins are cooked, insert a skewer into the centre of the muffin.  If it comes away clean, they are cooked.

Remove from the oven and allow to cool for a few minutes in the pan before removing and cooling on a wire rack.

These are delicious served warm with some ghee spread over them.

These can be stored in the refrigerator for a few days or kept in the freezer and re-heated when necessary.

Note: Some people may not be able to tolerate bi carb soda and baking powder as these can be made from rice flour.  If uncertain, please consult your Practitioner.

Rebecca Coomes is an author, entrepreneur, passionate foodie and intrepid traveller. She transformed her health after a lifetime of chronic illness, and today guides others on their own path to wellness. She is the founder of The Healthy Gut, a platform where people can learn about gut health and how it is important for a healthy mind and body. Rebecca is also the author of the world’s first cookbooks for people treating Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) and the host of the SIBO cooking show and The Healthy Gut podcast.

Rebecca Coomes SIBO

Malaysian prawn and chicken laksa

‘I adore sitting down to enjoy a big bowl of steaming laksa.  The flavours of Malaysia sing in this dish, and it makes a filling lunch, dinner or supper for any day of the week.  You will feel transported to the hawker stalls in a bustling Malaysian city from the first mouthful.’ Rebecca Coomes

4 serves

Classification: Phase 1 semi-restricted, GF, DF, LF

Ingredients

Laksa paste

  • 2 lemongrass stalks, white part only, chopped
  • 10 macadamia nuts
  • 4 dried red chillies
  • 2 tbs dried shrimp, no sugar added
  • 1 tbs belacan, no sugar added
  • 2 tsp ground coriander
  • 3 cm fresh turmeric, grated
  • 3 cm fresh ginger, grated
  • 3 cm fresh galangal, grated
  • 4 keffir lime leaves
  • ½ bunch coriander, stalks and roots, washed

Soup

  • 2 cups rice noodles
  • 4 tbs coconut oil
  • 1.25L chicken stock, see recipe page xx
  • 250ml coconut milk
  • 12 prawns
  • 2 chicken thighs
  • 2 limes
  • Handful of coriander leaves
  • Salt to taste

Method

Place the rice noodles in a big bowl and cover with lukewarm water.  Set aside.

Place all of the laksa paste ingredients in a food processor and blend until smooth.  If the paste is too thick, add 1 tablespoon of water at a time until it blends thoroughly.

Peel and devein the prawns, leaving the tails in tact.  Keep the shells, heads and legs.  Refrigerate the prawns until you are ready to cook them.

Heat a large wok over a high heat.  Add the coconut oil then add the prawn shells.  Stir fry for a few minutes until the shells are a deep pink colour and aromatic.  With a slotted spoon, remove the shells and discard.

Pour the laksa paste into the wok.  Stir-fry for 2 – 3 minutes, stirring continuously so the paste doesn’t stick and burn.  This will release the beautiful aromas of the spices.  If the paste is getting too dry, add more coconut oil.

Pour in the chicken stock and coconut milk, and bring to a boil.  Reduce the heat to medium.  Add in the chicken pieces and cook for 3 – 4 minutes or until cooked through.  Add the prawns and cook for a further 1 – 2 minutes.

Squeeze in the juice of 1 lime.  Taste and season accordingly.

Drain the rice noodles from the water and add these to the laksa.  Stir to mix thoroughly. Once the noodles are al dente, divide the soup between 4 large bowls.

Serve sprinkled with fresh coriander and with lime wedges on the side.

Note: The dried shrimp come in packets and look just like small shrimp.  The belacan is made from dried shrimp and comes in a block.  The aroma is pungent so should be stored in an airtight container in the fridge. They can be found in Asian speciality supermarkets.

To make this suitable for Phase 1 – restricted, omit the rice noodles.

Rebecca Coomes is an author, entrepreneur, passionate foodie and intrepid traveller. She transformed her health after a lifetime of chronic illness, and today guides others on their own path to wellness. She is the founder of The Healthy Gut, a platform where people can learn about gut health and how it is important for a healthy mind and body. Rebecca is also the author of the world’s first cookbooks for people treating Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) and the host of the SIBO cooking show and The Healthy Gut podcast.

Rebecca Coomes SIBO

Roast pumpkin, carrots, and fennel

‘Nothing beats gorgeous roasted vegetables, and this trio of vegetables work perfectly with roast meats, fish and poultry.  They are the perfect partners to a big Sunday roast lunch or dinner.’ Rebecca Coomes

Classification: Phase 1 friendly, GF, V, LF

4 serves

Pre-heat the oven to 180oC/355oF.

Roast pumpkin

Ingredients

  • 2 cups pumpkin, sliced or chunks
  • ½ tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tbs olive oil

Method

Place the pumpkin in a large bowl. Sprinkle with the cumin and salt and drizzle with olive oil. Stir to combine.  Line a baking tray with baking paper then place the pumpkin on it.  Place in the oven and roast for 45 – 60 minutes, or until the pumpkin is golden brown and cooked through.

Thyme roasted carrots

Ingredients

  • 2 bunches baby carrots, trimmed and washed
  • ½ bunch thyme, leaves picked
  • 2 tbs ghee, melted
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp pepper

Method

Place the baby carrots in a large bowl. Drizzle with melted ghee, and sprinkle with the thyme leaves, salt and pepper. Stir to combine.  Line a baking tray with baking paper then place the carrots on it.  Place in the oven and roast for 45 – 60 minutes, or until they are golden brown and cooked through.

Roast fennel

Ingredients

  • 2 fennel, quartered
  • 1 lemon, sliced
  • 2 tbs olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Method

Line a baking tray with baking paper then place the fennel on it.  Drizzle with olive oil, scatter with lemon slices, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place in the oven and roast for 45 – 60 minutes, or until the fennel is soft and cooked through.

Rebecca Coomes is an author, entrepreneur, passionate foodie and intrepid traveller. She transformed her health after a lifetime of chronic illness, and today guides others on their own path to wellness. She is the founder of The Healthy Gut, a platform where people can learn about gut health and how it is important for a healthy mind and body. Rebecca is also the author of the world’s first cookbooks for people treating Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) and the host of the SIBO cooking show and The Healthy Gut podcast.

Rebecca Coomes SIBO

Baked Vanilla & Coconut Custard

Time for a tasty treat (Phase 1 friendly)

‘I have always adored custard.  Hot, warm and cold custard all taste equally as delicious to me. I love the simplicity of the flavours in this recipe, and how easy it is to make scrumptious pots of custard in no time.’  Rebecca Coomes

6 serves

Classification
SR, GF, V, DV, LF

Ingredients

  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 1 cup almond milk, unsweetened
  • 1 vanilla bean, split
  • 3 eggs
  • 4-6 drops stevia
  • ½ tsp nutmeg

Method
Pre-heat the oven to 160oC/320oF.

Place the coconut milk and almond milk in a saucepan.  Scrape the seeds out of the vanilla bean and add them and the bean to the milk. Heat the milk until it almost comes to the boil, then remove from the heat. Remove the vanilla bean and discard.

Meanwhile, mix the eggs and stevia in a large bowl until well combined.

Gradually pour the hot milk into the egg mixture, stirring constantly, so the eggs don’t scramble.

Divide the custard between 6 small ramekins.  Sprinkle some nutmeg over the top of each custard. Place the ramekins in a deep baking tray, then fill the tray with hot water until it comes halfway up the ramekins.

Place in the oven and bake for 30 – 40 minutes or until the custards have set.  Remove from the oven then remove from the water bath.  This custard can be eaten straight away or chilled and eaten cold.

Thanks for this dessert Rebecca!

If you’d like more like this, head on over to check out some of Rebecca Coomes’ other brilliant recipes.

SIBO patients can feel at a loss in the kitchen during their treatment. What to cook? What to combine? What to use?

Rebecca Coomes, SIBO recipe creator extraordinaire and founder of The Healthy Gut has teamed up with us to share her delicious dishes with us weekly.

These recipes are all based on Dr Nirala Jacobi’s Bi Phasic Diet, and so we fully support guiding your patients to use Rebecca’s recipes as a resource during their treatment.

Rebecca Coomes is an author, entrepreneur, passionate foodie and intrepid traveller. She transformed her health after a lifetime of chronic illness, and today guides others on their own path to wellness. She is the founder of The Healthy Gut, a platform where people can learn about gut health and how it is important for a healthy mind and body. Rebecca is also the author of the world’s first cookbooks for people treating Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) and the host of the SIBO cooking show and The Healthy Gut podcast.

Rebecca Coomes SIBO